Undressing the Human Soul – Ersilia Leonini

Undressing the Human Soul
By Ersilia Leonini

September 16 – October 13, 2015

Student Curators: Giovanna Franciosa, Meaghan White, Sydnie Kroneberger, Brianna Tepper

Faculty Coordinator: Gianni Rossiello

ersilia

About the Exhibition:
There are no bodies in Ersilia Leonini paintings, there are people; there are no men or women in the works of this silent and deep artist, there are the souls of the people she knows and reveals. These works don’t appear to be the fleeting passion of an approach, but the full pleasure of knowledge.
Only a few are able to go beyond a trivial look, many confuse being male or female with the human being, as to undress each other in a bed of fake appearance. Only a few are able to undress the soul, to read the other like a book finding new emotions every day, such as a tear or a smile. The innermost part of the other you take listening: you are naked and unknown, dressed and melted in. You take the innermost part of the other by reaching a point that no one else has ever reached before: the soul.

Artist Bio:
Born in Florence in 1955. She graduated from the Art Institute of Siena and she took courses in Art History, Film and Theater. She also took classes for cameramen and photographers at the Technical Research Centre of Florence Film. In 1978 she exhibited his first painting show. Together with other artists in Siena, she gave life to “iperfantastico”, a style that utilizes color and form in strict geometric compositions. In the eighties she opened a lab in Siena where she created artistic masks – which were later incorporated in some theater choreographies and an internship in New York. These masks were later exhibited as real sculptures. Her fervent activity hepled her take part in numerous national and international exhibitions; the most recent being, between 2011 and 2012, the exhibition “Pelle” at “Simultanea – Spazi d’Arte” in Florence, a show at the Gallery “Arte in Movimento” in Forte dei Marmi and an impressive commission for a private collection that brought her to work in Paris.

See the catalog here.